This week the theme of my chess lessons was “Blunders”.   As I sat at home last night watching the live games in the Box Hill Autumn Cup I was gifted several new examples to illustrate this topic.

On board 1 the top seed Eugene Schon was facing 3-times Australia Champion, Doug Hamilton, who, at age 75, still plays a pretty good game of chess.  They arrived at the following position with Black to play.

[iframe width=”500″ height=”685″ src=”http://chessmicrobase.com/microbases/9295/games/926187?token=78ftfqzs&embedded=1#hcp-” frameborder=”0″>]

Meanwhile on board 2 Issac Zhao and Kris Chan had arrived at a really boring rook ending with rook and 4 pawns each and no passed pawns.  Surprisingly they did not agree to a draw but swapped of into a king and pawn ending with the higher rated Chan (Black) pressing for a win.  They arrived at the following position with both sides racing to queen first.  Eventually they realised that they both queened and so agreed to a draw.  Play through the moves and see if you can find what they missed!

[iframe width=”500″ height=”685″ src=”http://chessmicrobase.com/microbases/9295/games/926176?token=gt74w2u9&embedded=1#hcp-” frameborder=”0″>]

On board 3 there was also an interesting game in which Luis Chan appeared to blunder a rook.  They played on and surprisingly White was able to hold a draw so the “blunder” turned out not to be so bad after all.   Chess is a strange game.

[iframe width=”500″ height=”685″ src=”http://chessmicrobase.com/microbases/9295/games/926188?token=atjh73aa&embedded=1#hcp-” frameborder=”0″>]

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