This position is from the game Vinay Lakshman v IM James Morris in the recent RJ Shield Tournament. White entered the rook endgame a pawn ahead but has allowed Black counter-play and now the game is in the balance. It probably depends on him finding the correct plan in the diagrammed position.

[fen caption=”What would you play as White?”]8/8/1k6/1p4RP/2p5/P5P1/1r6/4K3[/fen]

46.h6 Rh2 47.Rg6+ Ka5 48.g4 Ka4 49.Ra6+ Kb3 50.g5 c3 51.Rc6 c2 52.g6 Rxh6 53.g7 Rxc6 54.g8=Q+ Rc4 55.Qg3+ Ka2 56.Qg2 Kb1 57.Qg6 Kb2 58.Qg2 Kxa3 59.Qg3+ Ka2 60.Qg2 b4
Here White played the obvious 46.h6 and lost after
46…Rh2 47.Rg6+ Ka5 48.g4 Ka4 49.Ra6+ Kb3 50.g5 c3 51.Rc6 c2 52.g6 Rxh6 53.g7 Rxc6 54.g8(Q)+ Rc4 55.Qg3+ Ka2 56.Qg2 Kb1 57.Qg6 Kb2 58.Qg2 Kxa3 59.Qg3+ Ka2 60.Qg2 b4 0-1

Where did he go wrong?

ANSWER:
Rooks belong behind passed pawns! 46.Rg4 (to answer …Rh2 with Rh4) and White is winning.

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